Arts and crafts in Mozambique

This post is part of the Mozambique 2011 series. The previous post in this series is Daily life in Mozambique – hardship and happiness.

As I mentioned in my previous post in this series, the local Mozambicans are artistically talented people. Their art takes many forms including wood carvings, pottery, paintings, locally made and dyed fabrics, as well as bead and shell jewelery.

Fish carvings being made and sold along the road between Pomene and Maputo. ©WMB

The process starts with tree stumps being chopped into large wooden blocks. The young man chopping in this photograph is the son of the carver. He is using an axe with a handle made out of mahogany wood and a blade made from the leaf spring of a truck. ©WMB

The artist starting to work on a new fish carving. His tool is similar to the axe being used above, but is smaller with the blade being orientated differently. ©WMB

A carving completed and ready for polishing. A combination of shoe and furniture polish is used to give the wood color and protect it. ©WMB

Artists in Mozambique do not all have access to galleries to display their works.

Sidewalk exhibition: An artist displaying his paintings on a sidewalk in Vilanculos, Mozambique. ©Theo van Zyl

Sidewalk exhibition: A close-up of some of the paintings. ©Theo van Zyl

At “Pomene City”(a group of about 10 grass huts, housing small businesses) is a “curio shop” where local artists display and sell their work.

The curio shop at Pomene, Mozambique. ©Dawie Bester

As I did not have any close-ups of the actual items for sale here, I have zoomed in on particular areas of the above photo. You can click on the images below to enlarge them.

I love the cat carvings in the foreground. I wonder whether this specific artist has an interest in cats, or whether he knows that some tourists do? Also see the intricately carved stools and little tables in the foreground. ©Dawie Bester

Even some of the wooden posts supporting the grass hut have carvings on them (see post to left of store owner in the photograph). The stand which displays the bead necklaces in front is also a carving. ©Dawie Bester

Carved wooden boxes of various sizes are displayed at the bottom of the photograph, with paintings hung against the walls of the hut. ©Dawie Bester

Locally manufactured and dyed fabrics blowing in the wind at Pomene, Mozambique. ©WMB

More fabrics and clothing made out of the same material. ©WMB

There is art everywhere, some of it on display but not for sale.

Mural at Maxixe, Mozambique. ©Berry Linde

Another view of the above mural. ©Berry Linde

A mosaic floor in Vilanculos, Mozambique. ©Heyns Kotze

Wood carvings as directions to the ladies and gents bathrooms. ©Heyns Kotze

The Mozambique 2011 Series:

Thank you to Heyns Kotze, Theo van Zyl, Berry Linde, Dawie Bester and Willie for allowing me to use their beautiful photographs for this post. See individual photos for credits.

A special thank you to Willie for providing the information used to write this post.

About these ads

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Lifestyle/Travel, Random

Author:lisa@notesfromafrica

I live on the Southern coast of South Africa, and write about the things that interest, amuse or inspire me. You can find me at http://notesfromafrica.wordpress.com and http://southerncape.wordpress.com (my photoblog)

Subscriptions

Subscribe to the Notes from Africa RSS and Twitter feeds to receive updates.

156 Comments on “Arts and crafts in Mozambique”

  1. May 20, 2011 at 9:54 am #

    Lisa, my daughter and I enjoyed the excursion. Thank you!

  2. May 20, 2011 at 10:22 am #

    I love the pics you’ve included of the art being created – especially the guy making the fish the with the wood chips all around. The palm trees and sand make for a beautiful exhibition space, too. I never tire of African art.

    • May 20, 2011 at 12:43 pm #

      The carver sitting amongst the wood chips is also one of my favourites. It gives you a real idea of what it takes to carve something like that. You would love Mozambique, and especially the people there.

      • May 20, 2011 at 12:49 pm #

        I’ve only been once, for a weekend in Maputo. Would love to go back.

      • May 20, 2011 at 1:03 pm #

        At least you’ve been – I haven’t! Willie has been further north, and he says things change from one region to another. What they grow, what they do, their artwork etc. I’m hoping that he’ll include something about that in one of the posts he’s agreed to write about the trip! ;-)

  3. May 20, 2011 at 11:13 am #

    This is fabulous post, Lisa, et. al.! The carving is amazing. The mural–wow–how incredible! Thanks so much————————–
    Kathy

    • May 20, 2011 at 12:54 pm #

      Thank you, Kathy! I thought you would appreciate the Mozambican artwork. Thank also for acknowledging the contribution of the others – if it hadn’t been for their photographs and the stories they came back with, there would not have been any Mozambique 2011 posts.

      Hope you and Sara enjoy your holiday! :-)

  4. Lu
    May 20, 2011 at 12:11 pm #

    I’m always amazed at how the craftsmen can create such wonderful artwork, carvings and paintings with the most rudimentary of tools at their disposal. Clearly they don’t have to worry about the saying “a bad workman blames his tools”!

  5. Lu
    May 20, 2011 at 12:13 pm #

    Oohh!! Just noticed that I have made your blogroll!! WOW! Thank you Lisa! :)

    • May 20, 2011 at 12:59 pm #

      You’re very welcome. I spend so much time on your blogs that I figured it was about time. You actually made it on twice – for your photo-blog too!

  6. May 20, 2011 at 8:27 pm #

    I kove the brightly coloured fabrics, I would love to get my hands on some of those. These people are handsome aren’t they?

    • May 21, 2011 at 6:02 am #

      The fabric colours very much reflect the general “personality” of the Mozambique people. Most of the photos of the women have them wearing bright colours.

      Yes, I agree, the people are very handsome – beautiful or striking faces.

  7. jacquelincangro
    May 20, 2011 at 8:48 pm #

    It was so neat to see the wood carver making the fish. Kind of like it just emerged from the tree. Creativity and inspiration comes from many sources.

    The photo of the pants blowing in the wind reminds me of the Tibetan prayer flags for some reason. Love the colors.

    • May 21, 2011 at 6:05 am #

      I have a lot of admiration for these sculptors. To be able to imagine a multidimensional object when looking at a piece of wood, is to me amazing.

      I agree with you about the Tibetan prayer flags. Couldn’t remember what those fabrics and pants reminded me of until you mentioned it!

  8. May 21, 2011 at 11:41 am #

    Amazing stuff. They are real artists.

  9. May 22, 2011 at 3:14 pm #

    I love the fabrics, very colorful !! and the paintings are great!! all the wooden work … wow, it takes talent!! I´ve always admired them!! Maybe the cats are an influence from the north? a sacred animal?

    • May 22, 2011 at 4:11 pm #

      You may be right about the cats being an influence from the north. What with the arab traders “setting up shop” along the coast. And I can’t remember seeing any carvings of dogs or other pets.

      • May 22, 2011 at 4:30 pm #

        Arab traders covered a wide area, I guess you can trace influences from Asia to Africa following the route.
        Here there are shops that sell carvings, from Africa and from India mainly. And I´ve seen cats everywhere!! I love browsing in those stores even when I know that some products are fake (not from where they say they come from if not from local artists).

      • May 23, 2011 at 1:07 pm #

        Do you know if the African and Indian carvings you see in Argentina are factory produced or done by carvers with hand tools? I know that there is an organization in South Africa that markets original handmade bead work from local artists i.e. the local artists make decent money. I really hope that the artists in Mozambique get paid what they’re worth.

      • May 23, 2011 at 2:57 pm #

        Well, that´s really my doubt. First, if they are fake and second if they are really hand made. They price the items as if they were made of Gold but they don´t give you a certificate of origin.
        We have organizations here that sell products made by our natives and they usually don´t get money out of it or very little. I was in Salta (our north) and wanted to buy some ceramics. I went to a store and they were really expensive. Then a man told me to go to a place where they were made and the relationship was something like 100 less of what it was charged at the store. The artists said they get very little money in exchange.

  10. Estie
    May 22, 2011 at 8:16 pm #

    Love the fabrics! Beautiful pictures. It is a really nice place to visit.

    • May 23, 2011 at 1:08 pm #

      Everybody loves the fabrics! Yes, it is a beautiful place. I’d love to go, but I don’t think I’d survive the climate (hot and humid) there.

  11. May 31, 2011 at 4:22 pm #

    Gorgeous photos. My father-in-law, an avid fly fisherman, would just love those fish carvings.

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:52 am #

      Thank you! The fish carvings are stunning – and big! Most of the carvings are of Kingfish.

      Willie is going to be writing a post about his fishing experiences in Mozambique – which will be aimed at fishermen who are interested in all the details.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  12. May 31, 2011 at 4:24 pm #

    Stunning pieces — thank you for sharing!
    :)

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:53 am #

      Glad that you like the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  13. May 31, 2011 at 4:31 pm #

    Congrats to you all – you’re Freshly Pressed!! :)

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:54 am #

      Thank you! Yes, this post was definitely a collaboration – I had a lot of beautiful photos to pick from.

  14. May 31, 2011 at 4:58 pm #

    wow! awesome! very artistic….

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:55 am #

      Yes, isn’t the art wonderful? Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  15. May 31, 2011 at 5:07 pm #

    Marvellous, amazing post and pictures:)

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:56 am #

      Thank you – I’m glad you enjoyed it. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  16. May 31, 2011 at 5:18 pm #

    OMG, Lisa–congrats on FP-ed, my friend!
    Kathy

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:58 am #

      Thank you, Kathy! I have to share the honour with the photographers who took such wonderful photos of the artwork.

  17. May 31, 2011 at 5:20 pm #

    Fantastic photographs, showing off some beautiful art. Thanks for sharing them :)

    • June 1, 2011 at 6:59 am #

      I’m glad that you enjoyed the photographs. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  18. May 31, 2011 at 5:31 pm #

    I love your pics and I LOVE the dunny directions! What a hoot!

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:06 am #

      Thank you – I’m glad that you enjoyed the photos. There is another photograph where somebody painted a mural on outside wall of the bathrooms to give directions. I wondered whether this was because of the high illiteracy in Mozambique – or whether they just found it more aesthetically pleasing.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  19. May 31, 2011 at 5:37 pm #

    This is a great piece and I thought it might be FP’d. Congrats!

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:08 am #

      Thanks! I’m very happy that my “roving reporters” are getting recognition for doing such a good job on their photo-assignment! :-)

  20. May 31, 2011 at 6:02 pm #

    The carvings are spectacular. Living in the fishtown section of philadelphia, I could definitely put one of the fishes in front of my house! The cats are awesome too.

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:11 am #

      The carvings are amazing, aren’t they? The ability to carve out a multidimensional object from a chunk of wood is mind-boggling. A couple of those fishes came back to South Africa with the group – think the fish carvings are very difficult for fishermen to resist! I’d love one of the cat carvings too.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  21. wrecmom
    May 31, 2011 at 6:13 pm #

    Such beautiful craftsmanship! I love this post!

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:12 am #

      Yes, there is something special about handmade art. Am glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  22. May 31, 2011 at 7:16 pm #

    Beautiful art. Congrats on Freshly Pressed.

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:13 am #

      Thank you! It was easy to write a post about such beautiful art.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  23. May 31, 2011 at 7:17 pm #

    Lisa – I was so exicted to see this post when I signed in today! I was able to visit Mozambique several years ago and just loved my experience! The people are wonderful, the scenery is beautiful and the arts are just fabulous! As an American I am always excited to find someone who knows about Mozambique – which is not many here in the States! Thanks so much for sharing these stories and the pictures, it brings back such wonderful memories!

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:19 am #

      I am glad that this post brought back lovely memories of your visit to Mozambique. You’re right about Mozambique being a very unique and beautiful country, and its people equally special.

      This post was part of a series about a 2011 trip to Mozambique. If you haven’t already seen the other posts, the links can be found at the bottom of this post.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  24. May 31, 2011 at 7:21 pm #

    They are very creative! Thanks for sharing. :)

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:20 am #

      Yes, they are very creative. Glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  25. saltybi11
    May 31, 2011 at 7:23 pm #

    It is really neat to see how these carvings can be made with such simple tools… thanks

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:21 am #

      Yes, using simple tools to produce such beautiful carvings is the sign of true talent.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  26. May 31, 2011 at 7:23 pm #

    Amazing pictures :)

  27. eva626
    May 31, 2011 at 7:25 pm #

    woa this is AMAZING!!!

    • June 1, 2011 at 7:23 am #

      It is, isn’t it?! Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  28. May 31, 2011 at 7:32 pm #

    You will find artists like these in many of the other African countries. The use of colour is beautiful and not found often in the western countries. Personally I love the batik (which I saw you did not make a reference to).

    • June 1, 2011 at 8:58 am #

      Yes, there are artists like this all over Africa. The artwork does vary though. Here in South Africa (where I live) we don’t have so many of those brightly printed fabrics which you see a lot of further north. Mozambique because of it’s long coastline and situation on the trade routes, also has an Arabian influence not seen in many other African countries.

      The batiks: Well spotted! I was thinking of them as “paintings” too, but you’re right, the technique is very different.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  29. thor27
    May 31, 2011 at 7:45 pm #

    Amazing artisans and the blog was very well presented with nice photographs I like it very good !!!

  30. May 31, 2011 at 7:46 pm #

    very colorful love the paintings and the fabrics

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:20 am #

      Yes, the colours are wonderful, aren’t they? Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  31. thor27
    May 31, 2011 at 7:46 pm #

    Check me sometime at http://thor27.wordpress.com I liked your blog and subscribed.

  32. May 31, 2011 at 8:11 pm #

    The art and culture is amazing I love the pictures!

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:30 am #

      I am glad that you liked the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  33. May 31, 2011 at 8:19 pm #

    great works of art!

  34. May 31, 2011 at 8:37 pm #

    Thanks for sharing these – loved the arm-chair travel! :)

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:31 am #

      It’s a pleasure. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  35. May 31, 2011 at 8:37 pm #

    wow – BEAUTIFUL art! I love the paintings that were rolled out on the ground, so vibrant and full of life… I have been learning Portuguese and went to Brazil recently, and I would LOVE to visit Mozambique too.
    thanks!

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:34 am #

      I also liked those paintings – very unusual depiction of human faces and as you say, so vibrant. If you can speak Portuguese you would do well in Mozambique. Even though Mozambique is now independent, Portuguese is still their official language.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  36. May 31, 2011 at 8:49 pm #

    As an ethnomusicologist interested in all forms of culture, I loved this post.. I’m so glad I stumbled on it. Awesome photos! Can’t wait to read more from you!

    Cheers!
    -D

    http://sociosound.wordpress.com

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:38 am #

      Thank you for visiting my blog and for your kind comments! :-) I’m going to be checking out your site. Want to find out what an ethnomusicologist does . . . sounds very interesting.

  37. May 31, 2011 at 9:10 pm #

    Very cool works of art. I love the mosaic floor!

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:40 am #

      The mosaic floor is very pretty – art is everywhere in Mozambique.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  38. May 31, 2011 at 9:44 pm #

    Would LOVE one of those wooden fish! This was a great post- loved all the pics. Of course I’m not the only one Fresh Pressed!!!! Congratulations!!! Second time right?

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:45 am #

      Getting a wooden fish to Japan might be a challenge – they are BIG!

      Thanks, yes it’s the second time for getting FPed. Although I share this honour with my fearless roving “photojournalists”, who drove for thousands of kilometers and slogged through the tropical heat, to bring back some really wonderful photographs.

  39. Eva McCane
    May 31, 2011 at 9:44 pm #

    those scarves and the artwork are amazing! i need to visit and pick a few things up!

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:46 am #

      Yes, there are some great shopping opportunities there. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  40. May 31, 2011 at 10:07 pm #

    Love those fabrics! I would buy them!

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:48 am #

      Yes, the fabrics are lovely. It’s interesting that the same colours and designs are reflected in the various art forms e.g. fabrics and paintings.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  41. May 31, 2011 at 10:10 pm #

    very interesting !

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:49 am #

      Glad to hear you like the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  42. May 31, 2011 at 10:31 pm #

    Great pics! Congrats on being freshly pressed!

  43. May 31, 2011 at 11:12 pm #

    Great artists abound everywhere. Thanks for sharing.

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:51 am #

      My pleasure – my blog is all about sharing things which I find interesting.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  44. May 31, 2011 at 11:53 pm #

    Fascinating, long time since I was last there.

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:52 am #

      Were you there on vacation?

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  45. June 1, 2011 at 12:51 am #

    It is so great to see real handmade art instead of what we see a lot of in the U.S., machine made, made-in-China stuff. Terrific photos.

    • June 1, 2011 at 9:55 am #

      I agree – what makes this art so special is that it is all handmade. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  46. shamiparyah
    June 1, 2011 at 1:23 am #

    The pics are absolutely beautiful!

  47. June 1, 2011 at 1:32 am #

    Everything about the post is beautiful. You had a great adventure most of us can only dream about . Thanks for sharing and congrats!

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:13 pm #

      I am glad that you enjoyed the post. Appreciate your taking time to read it and for your kind comments! :-)

  48. June 1, 2011 at 1:53 am #

    Amazing! Love the fish and all the beautiful fabrics!

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:16 pm #

      The artwork is amazing. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  49. June 1, 2011 at 2:22 am #

    Thanks you for your posting, I very much enjoyed yours.
    The colors they have or they use, they always fairly inspire me… and their art, realistic and abstract at the same time and primative but surrealistic simultaneously. As you commented, yes, I can tell a bit of their personality by the colors as well..

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:23 pm #

      I am glad that you enjoyed the post. You’re right about the art being a mixture of realistic/abstract and primitive/surrealistic. Makes me wonder about the influences on their art – old African culture overlaid by more modern European colonialism. I don’t know much about art, but it would be interesting to find out.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  50. June 1, 2011 at 2:43 am #

    They have amazing works.

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:23 pm #

      I am glad that you enjoyed looking at them. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  51. June 1, 2011 at 2:51 am #

    Very nice variety of work! Being a seamstress, of course I am going to say I love the fabric. But I think the carvings are nice, too.

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:26 pm #

      A lot of people who have seen these photographs, comment about the beautiful fabric. The bright colours immediately capture your attention.

      Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  52. June 1, 2011 at 3:40 am #

    Excellent. Wonderful post. Loved your details I blog about art at http://www.scarletcanvas.com. Please give it a read.

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:27 pm #

      I am glad that you enjoyed the post. Appreciate your taking time to read it and for your kind comments! :-)

      I’ll check out your blog.

  53. June 1, 2011 at 3:46 am #

    It looks beautiful there. Thanks for sharing.

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:28 pm #

      It is a beautiful place. Appreciate your taking time to visit my blog and for your kind comments! :-)

  54. June 1, 2011 at 3:48 am #

    Beautiful Photos! Love learning about other cultures.

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:30 pm #

      Glad to hear that you enjoyed the post and photos. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  55. June 1, 2011 at 4:45 am #

    Beautiful textures…wood, stone, fabrics and did I see jawbone? I love the fabrics blowing in the wind. Is it windy there? And I love the pastels of life figures. Thank you for bringing these to us.

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:33 pm #

      Yes, there are a couple of shark jawbones! Being at the coast, there are windy days, but I don’t think it’s especially windy. Unless a hurricane is moving through, of course! ;-)

      I am glad that you enjoyed the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  56. June 1, 2011 at 4:59 am #

    great craftsmanship these people are really artistic and talented

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:35 pm #

      It is amazing how people with so few tools, can produce such beautiful art. The sign of real artistic talent. Thank you for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  57. June 1, 2011 at 8:57 am #

    The article in your blog reminds me some old memory.It gives me happy.I think we will have a harmonious talk.

  58. hiraman
    June 1, 2011 at 8:59 am #

    That’s really artistic. I mean the fishes. Have never seen something like this. The Indian coast is very huge but I haven’t come across artist working on wood and carving fishes. My exposure to African art has been fleeting. Last time I was in Mauritius I picked up two wooden sculptures which I was told came from Madagascar. They are still there in my drawing room along the books. Enjoyed visiting your blog. Will come often

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:42 pm #

      Are you from India? What kind of things do the artists carve there?

      I am glad that you enjoyed the post and my blog. Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment! :-)

  59. Lu
    June 1, 2011 at 10:28 am #

    WOO HOO!! Go Lisa! – Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed – 110% deserved!

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:43 pm #

      Thank you Lu! I am glad that the photographers whose photos I’ve been using for my Mozambique posts, are getting the exposure and recognition they deserve.

  60. June 1, 2011 at 12:03 pm #

    Great post! Congratulations on being freshly pressed again. Deb

  61. June 1, 2011 at 1:24 pm #

    Great post. Loved the photos and the fabrics. I have friends in Mozambique, and a background in Textiles. Thanks for sharing!

    • June 1, 2011 at 3:47 pm #

      That is interesting – do your friends in Mozambique also work in the textile industry?

      Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment! :-)

  62. June 1, 2011 at 2:07 pm #

    nice post!

  63. Julio Ibanez
    June 1, 2011 at 3:15 pm #

    Inspiring post and great blog! Thanks for sharing the experience!

  64. thor27
    June 1, 2011 at 3:54 pm #

    Hello again !!!

  65. Mackenzie | Red Roan Chronicles
    June 1, 2011 at 7:12 pm #

    Wow, that’s all so beautiful! I really love the carvings, and those giant fish are amazing! Wish I had half the talent these guys do… amazing. Thanks for sharing this with us. :)

    • June 2, 2011 at 7:06 am #

      That kind of natural talent is stunning, isn’t it? Glad to hear that you liked the post. Thank you for visiting my blog and for leaving a comment! :-)

  66. June 2, 2011 at 10:18 pm #

    The pictures are awesome. I love this kind of stuff.

    • June 3, 2011 at 9:33 am #

      I am glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  67. June 3, 2011 at 8:17 am #

    Wow, amazing! That guy didn’t use any advanced tool on that fish carving? It looks like forever to finish that artwork.
    ~Natalie

    • June 3, 2011 at 10:18 am #

      No, he just used the hand tool in the photograph. Didn’t find out how long it takes him to finish a carving, but he works quite fast. Thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  68. June 18, 2011 at 10:33 pm #

    Wow those fish sculpture are cool.

    • June 19, 2011 at 9:28 am #

      Yes, they’re great, aren’t they? Thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment! :-)

  69. Corn Syrup
    December 14, 2011 at 12:08 pm #

    very beautiful picture..mozambique is nice

  70. November 24, 2012 at 8:36 am #

    What a wonderful post. Beautiful artwork. Mozambique is definitely a great area of much talent. I realize this post is from 2001, but back then I hadn’t found your blog yet :)

    • November 24, 2012 at 9:27 am #

      Thanks Danice! Ah, I’m always happy when people find some of my older posts. :-)

  71. February 13, 2013 at 1:10 pm #

    C’est l’Art Africain dans toute sa beauté et sa splendeur.

    • February 14, 2013 at 7:29 am #

      Yes, Africa has some amazing artists. I love how the designs vary from region to region.

  72. March 3, 2013 at 4:35 pm #

    WOW! Beautiful arts and crafts.

    Thank you for visiting my blog today. I appreciate the time you took to stop by. May your day be filled with joy and peace.
    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

    • March 4, 2013 at 6:27 am #

      Yes, the Mozambicans are talented artists and craftsmen. Thanks for your kind comment!

  73. March 9, 2013 at 5:53 pm #

    The art and textiles are amazing!

    • March 10, 2013 at 9:12 am #

      They are amazing – especially considering the very basic tools they use to produce them.

  74. April 2, 2014 at 10:03 am #

    Hi,
    I am Mona from India and am presently working on setting up my own online store dealing in handicrafts especially sourced from poor countries.I like the work done in Mozambique especially gourd painting , fabric dolls ,fish carvings etc.
    Could you guide who to get in touch with and how to locate sellers who would be interested in dropshipping for my store.A quick reply will be really appreciated.
    Regards
    Mona

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Arts and crafts in Mozambique (via Notes from Africa) « Laura Barbosa's Heart of Art Blog - May 31, 2011

    […] Arts and crafts in Mozambique (via Notes from Africa) This post is part of the Mozambique 2011 series. The previous post in this series is Daily life in Mozambique – hardship and happiness. As I mentioned in my previous post in this series, the local Mozambicans are artistically talented people. Their art takes many forms including wood carvings, pottery, paintings, locally made and dyed fabrics, as well as bead and shell jewelery.

  2. Arts and crafts in Mozambique | Travel to Johor - May 31, 2011

    […] Their art takes many forms including wood carvings, pottery, paintings, locally made and dyed […] FreshlyPressed This entry was posted in Kota Tinggi Waterfall and tagged Arts, crafts, Mozambique. Bookmark the […]

  3. Arts and crafts in Mozambique (via Notes from Africa) « My Writing Life - June 1, 2011

    […] This post is part of the Mozambique 2011 series. The previous post in this series is Daily life in Mozambique – hardship and happiness. As I mentioned in my previous post in this series, the local Mozambicans are artistically talented people. Their art takes many forms including wood carvings, pottery, paintings, locally made and dyed fabrics, as well as bead and shell jewelery.

  4. 19: Textile and Label Pattern Design, among others. | Almofate's Likes - November 8, 2013

    […] Conran Label Designs for Gordon’s Gin | One Sugar Please * Ochre fall leaves | Africantapestry * Arts and crafts in Mozambique | Notes from Africa * Namaqualand and the Tankwa Karoo: The Clanwilliam Flower Show | Notes from […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 697 other followers

%d bloggers like this: