Postcards from Namibia

This is a taste of what is to come in a series I’ll be starting soon about our road trip through Namibia. Please join me on the journey . . .

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This post is part of a series I will be publishing about our travels through Namibia. It is also part of my daily posts for October 2016 – otherwise known as The October Dash

 

 

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Categories: Lifestyle/Travel

Author:lisa@notesfromafrica

I live on the Southern coast of South Africa, and write about the things that interest, amuse or inspire me. You can find me at https://notesfromafrica.wordpress.com and http://southerncape.wordpress.com (my photoblog)

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22 Comments on “Postcards from Namibia”

  1. October 14, 2016 at 8:46 am #

    Like the Baobab trees!

    • October 15, 2016 at 7:59 am #

      Hi Mel & Suan! Thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment. 🙂 The photo I think you’re referring to is a forest of Quiver Trees. They grow in very dry environments whereas Baobab trees need more water. For comparison you can see a close-up of a Baobab tree in this post.

  2. October 14, 2016 at 2:53 pm #

    Can’t wait!

    • October 15, 2016 at 7:53 am #

      Get ready for a long “journey”! Got a lot of photos and stories to tell.

  3. Eha
    October 15, 2016 at 1:38 am #

    Hello teacher! What a fantastic lesson – do not want to leave the classroom. Simply wonderful photos: the rock and sand pics are incredible! But have spent most of the time studying the last one: I make it about 5-6 different animals grazing in the same spot in seemingly total harmony . . . how wonderful! As have said, a v special friend worked there: *smile* wonder how I would have seen it if visiting as asked . . .

    • October 15, 2016 at 7:52 am #

      Thanks Eha! Yes, all over Etosha we saw huge groups of different animals coming to the waterholes to drink. Like a “Noah’s Ark” in the wilds. No big predators in that group though. You should have taken up that invitation! 🙂

      • Eha
        October 16, 2016 at 2:49 am #

        Beautiful lady! That and being married to a guy I still loved did not match 🙂 ! Bad enough he managed to send me over a kilo [not kidding!] of semi-precious stones from the area and my Lordship naturally scowled . . . that particular summer fjord line trip in Norway had a lot to answer for . . . 🙂 ! Lovely memory . . . I hope he found his special one . . .

      • October 16, 2016 at 8:29 am #

        It does sound like a lovely memory. 🙂

      • Eha
        October 16, 2016 at 5:52 am #

        Sugar: they were simple ‘cat’s eyes’ and I had never thought to look . . . absolutely no comment but a lot of gratitude way after . . .

  4. October 15, 2016 at 3:56 am #

    Looking forward to it!

    • October 15, 2016 at 7:49 am #

      Looking over all our photos is bringing back good memories of the trip. 🙂

  5. October 16, 2016 at 4:34 am #

    Ahh Namibia! Where the world’s oldest desert lies and where desert meets the ocean. Looking forward to your next posts on Namibia!

    • October 16, 2016 at 8:31 am #

      Thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment. 🙂 You’ll see plenty of desert and rocks!

  6. October 16, 2016 at 10:16 am #

    Ooh, I am looking forward to reading all about this trip too, Lisa! Is the first photo of the Fish River Canyon? At which viewing site did you take that? The red dunes are so striking – particularly with the yellow grasses juxtaposed. Where are those chalets on the rocky hillside situated? Was the photo taken at sunset? The third last photo looks like the Spitzkoppe from a different angle… Each of these photos encapsulates such an interesting story waiting to be told!

    • October 16, 2016 at 10:26 am #

      Yes, the first photo is the Fish River Canyon. Wasn’t aware that there was more than one viewing site – will check on that for you.

      The chalets are at Moon Mountain Lodge (http://www.moonmountain.biz). Think the photo was taken in the late afternoon when the mountain behind the chalets was blocking the sun.

      You’re correct that is Spitzkoppe from a different angle.

      • October 16, 2016 at 2:39 pm #

        I haven’t been to the Spitzkoppe in ages, but always enjoy seeing it from a distance when driving down from Windhoek to Swakop, when it suddenly appears on the right hand side horizon.

        And the Lodge looks like an amazing place, would love to stay there sometime. I haven’t yet been to Sossusvlei, it’s still on our Must Visit List.

      • October 18, 2016 at 11:22 am #

        It was amazing to us how far away you can already see Spitzkoppe from.

        Sossusvlei is a fascinating place to visit, but also very busy – a lot more tourists than we expected.

    • October 16, 2016 at 10:50 am #

      Just looked at a map. We were staying at the Cayon Village near the Fish River Canyon & took the road past Hobas to the viewpoint there.

      • October 16, 2016 at 2:40 pm #

        Oh nice – I also investigated the option of staying there during a trip to the South; the vastness of that landscape just takes your breath away, doesn’t it?

      • October 18, 2016 at 11:14 am #

        Yes, it certainly does. Could have stayed there looking out for a lot longer. We made 3 trips to see the Canyon – at different times of day. The vastness made me think of how insignificant human life is in the grand scheme of things.

  7. October 25, 2016 at 10:37 pm #

    So incredibly unforgiving, yet immensely beautiful. It took me a long time to develop a love for deserts – being someone who likes water in the landcape! The Australian desert is just as stunning.

    • October 26, 2016 at 8:47 am #

      We’ve also begun to appreciate deserts more over the years. Especially after we started visiting the Kalahari. I’d love to travel around Australia!

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